Sandy Brown Jazz

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TEA BREAK

The monthly Tea Break is a series of short, fun items in What's New Magazine that also gives jazz musicians an opportunity to update us with what they are doing. Here are the Tea Breaks they (and I) have taken since 2015.

 

Utah Teapot



Sam Braysher
Trish Clowes
Bryan Corbett
Owen Dawson
Corrie Dick
Lara Eidi
Calum Gourlay
Frank Griffith
Andy Hague
Alec Harper
Johnny Hunter
Dave Manington
Andrew Linham
Rob Luft
Ian Maund
Corey Mwamba
Carl Orr
Alastair Penman
Alvin Roy
Henry Spencer
Simon Spillet
Alexander Stewart
Christine Tobin

 

 

Corey Mwamba (Vibraphone) September 2016

 

Corey Mwamba

 

Corey Mwamba is one of the U.K.’s most talented jazz vibraphone players. Born in Derby in 1976, he took lessons on a Yamaha organ when he was about eleven years old. “But I wasn’t all that interested in music,” says Corey. “My folks were into George Benson, Nat King Cole, Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong, but in the foolishness of youth, I wasn’t. In fact, I didn’t own any music until I reached sixteen when my first tape was an Otis Redding compilation. I got into jazz by the radio when I was trying to pick up a short-wave radio station while I was studying for my French exam. I had never heard anything like it! The broadcast was in French but I picked up on the name Jessica Williams. Anyway, I got hooked.”

As well as being in demand as a vibes player, Corey has been (and is) involved with a wealth of projects including Orrery - "Using the model of the orrery itself I created and devised new work to represent some of the ideas that shaped our thinking about astronomy and astrology around the time of the Enlightenment" and New Dark Art, a project exploring and demonstrating the ways in which improvisation, notation and conducting practices used in medieval music can inform and extend practice in composing for creative musicians. He also leads Out Front! A Derby-based music development organisation for the Midlands (click here to see Corey's various projects). In October, Corey will be going to Birmingham City University to study for a PhD degree so I caught up with him for a tea break while he still has a moment.

 

Hi Corey, tea or coffee?

Hmm. This time of day? Tea, please.



Milk and sugar?

Milk; one sugar, thank you.

Walt Dickerson

 

If you could ask two past jazz musicians to join us for the tea break, who would you invite?
 
At the moment, I'd raise Walt Dickerson and Herbie Fields.

 

Walt Dickerson



What would you ask them?

I'd ask Walt Dickerson just to talk! Although I would ask him to describe his voice on the vibraphone.

 

 

 

[Listen to Walt Dickerson playing It Ain't Necessarily So]

 

 

 

Herbie Fields

 

I'd ask Herbie Fields about his influences and where he thought music was going to go at the time when he was playing with Benny Harris - if you listen to Fields around that time, he's making Dolphy-like intervallic leaps on the sax, before the advent of bebop. I find that kind of thing really interesting.

 

Herbie Fields




Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Garibaldi!

 

What have you been doing recently?

In August, I did a gig/recording with Dave Kane and Joshua Blackmore in Derby for a record on Two Rivers that's coming out next year. I've been writing a piece for twelve great musicians that was commissioned by Jazz North-East; actually forcing myself to use standard Western notation for a change! Also thinking about sound on the vibes (hence summoning Dickerson) and reading up on phonetics. I have been working with the sound artist Gawain Hewitt, playing at Contrapop Festival in Ramsgate with the organist and composer Lauren Redhead and with Black Top in Derby.

 

[Here's a video of Corey with Dave Kane and Joshua Blackmore from 2013]

 

 

On the admin side, I run a jazz organisation called Out Front! and we've reached a halfway point; so we're evaluating what's happened so far, and how we can improve. I'm also trying to write up the health/well-being benefits of earlier start times for musicians. I've also made some headway formulating ideas for local artist development for Derby Jazz: I was made "artistic director" (i.e. programmer) in April.

 

[Tony Kofi talks about his music at Derby Jazz in this video before a gig including Corey Mwamba]

 

 

Corey Mwamba

 

What have you got coming up in the next few months?


I'm playing with Andy Champion and Ntshuks Bonga in Newcastle at the beginning of September, which is when the Derby Jazz season starts. Totally unrelated to either Derby Jazz or Out Front!, I've organised Chicagoan flautist Nicole Mitchell to come to Derby and play in a duo with Mark Sanders in the middle of September. I've got Sloth Racket (with Cath Roberts) at the end of September; and then I start my PhD at Birmingham City University in October.

Out Front! has "The Week" (of gigs) at the end of October; and then in the first week of November there seems to be nothing happening at all. But in the third week, Out Front! has Maggie Nichols, Joelle Leandre and Irene Schweitzer.



 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?


I'll just mention three: Johnny Hunter, Inclusion Principle, George Crowley's Can of Worms.

[Ed: See our review of Johnny Hunter's album While We Still Can] [Click here for the video introduction to George Crowley's Can Of Worms]



Another biscuit?

That would be lovely!

 

Utah Teapot

 

 

Christine Tobin (Vocals) August 2016

 

Christine Tobin

Photograph courtesy of Brian O'Connor, Images of Jazz

 

Christine Tobin is one of my favourite vocalists. Born in Dublin, she has been part of the London jazz and improvisation scene since the late 1980s and during that time she has established herself not just in the UK and Ireland but internationally. She was already singing in Ireland before she became interested in jazz through hearing Joni Mitchell’s Mingus album, and decided to move to London where she Christine Tobin and Liam Nobleworked with Jean Toussaint, Jason Rebello, Alec Dankworth and Mark Taylor. Christine took a degree course at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and after graduating she formed, toured, recorded and sang with various bands. In 2008 she won the Best Vocalist Award at the BBC Jazz Awards.

2010 saw the release of her Tapestry Unravelled album based on Carole King songs in a duo with pianist Liam Noble and two years later, her album Sailing To Byzantium, with settings of the poems of W.B. Yeats was described by Jazzwise magazine as ‘an unqualified masterpiece’. The album won Christine a British Composer Award in 2012. In 2014, she was named Jazz Vocalist of the Year at the Parliamentary Jazz Awards.

 

Christine Tobin and Liam Noble

 

 

Here they are with with Carole King's So Far Away

 

 

 

A Thousand Kisses Deep

 

In 2014 Christine released A Thousand Kisses Deep, an outstanding album of Leonard Cohen songs of which the Irish Times said "Tobin invests these songs with their full meaning, and even finds the odd glimmer of hope where none was formerly apparent". That release was accompanied by a tour, not just of major venues, but to packed village halls in rural locations around the UK with her usual guitarist, Phil Robson and bassist Dave Whitford.

 

In December 2015, Christine moved to New York where she has been building up a strong following in the United States. In July, I caught up with her for a Tea Break:

 

Hi Christine, tea or coffee?

Coffee, please…strong. 

Milk and sugar?

A little milk, no sugar thanks.

 

Billie Holiday

 

If you could ask two past jazz musicians to join us for the tea break, who would you invite?

Billie Holiday and Rahsaan Roland Kirk

 

What would you ask them?

I’d ask Billie if she had been able to have more control over her own career or the artistic freedom to go in whichever musical direction she chose, where would she have gone artistically and what people would she have liked to collaborate with?

The question for Rahsaan would be the following: I read somewhere that Jimi Hendrix was a huge fan of his and that he himself admired Hendrix. They were planning a collaboration. I would like to know how he envisioned their music making together?  Christine Tobin

 

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit? 

Mmmm….a Bourbon, neat please kind feller. 

 

Christine Tobin at Brecon Cathedral, Brecon Jazz Festival,
photograph by David Woodall

 

What gigs have you played recently?

I played at three North American Jazz Festivals recently; Rochester in New York, Edmonton and Vancouver in Canada, then back to NYC for a gig at Club Bonafide. I played with guitarist Phil Robson and the New York based Argentinian pianist Leo Genovese. It was our first time to play with Leo - he’s a musical tour de force and a really cool person too. 

 

 

Are you still featuring Leonard Cohen’s songs in your gigs?

Yes, I usually do at least two and occasionally I do a full programme of his songs - A Thousand Kisses Deep - which is also the name of the album I recorded of his songs back in 2014. In fact that was the concert/programme I was awarded the 'Herald Angel' for at the Edinburgh Festival back in 2013. Cohen is the biz!!

 

Here's Christine with Suzanne from A Thousand Kisses Deep.

 

 

 

What else have you got coming up? I can’t believe A Thousand Kisses Deep came out two years ago! Time for another album?

I have a gig at a jazz club in New York City called Kitano on July 27 with Phil Robson guitar, John Hebert double bass and Colin Stranahan drums. Then I have a trio gig on August 8 at the Bar Next Door in the Village with Phil Robson and the great double bass player, Harvie S.

My new album PELT will be released in late autumn. I have a UK launch gig at Soho’s Pizza Express Jazz Club, London on November 27. The songs are all original compositions. The lyrics and poems are by poet Paul Muldoon and music and arrangements by myself. 

 

Shai Maestro

 

 

I shall look forward to that. Let me know as soon as previews are available to share. Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?


I saw an amazing gig here last week at Joe’s Pub by the young pianist Shai Maestro. He is an astonishing player who writes beautiful, other-worldly music. He has incredible focus and control and chops to die for! The sound world he creates draws you into another dimension - which let’s face it ……. in these times is definitely a good thing!

Shai Maestro

 

 

 

 

Another biscuit?


Yeah, go on then, I’ll have another Bourbon! Set ‘em up Joe, oh sorry I mean Ian.

I see American Bourbon has had an impact while you have been there! Perhaps they should start putting some into these biscuits!

 

Christine Tobin aND dAVE wHITFORD

 

Christine Tobin with Dave Whitford photo by ForbesAnderson.com taken in Dundee
(The gig was on an amazing big old ship, I can’t remember the name of it!!)

 

Here is a video of Christine singing Corner Of An Eye filmed on location in Margate, Kent, UK in 2011.

 

 

 

[Click here for Christine Tobin's website].

 

Utah Teapot

 

 

 

Owen Dawson (Trombone) August 2016

 

Owen Dawson

 

Trombonist Owen Dawson originally comes from Suffolk but having graduated from the Jazz course at Royal Academy of Music this year, is now based in London. He has played for the West End Show, Sinatra: the Man and His Music and regularly plays with top UK big bands including the the Syd Lawrence Orchestra, the London City Big Band, the London Jazz Orchestra and the BBC Big Band.

Owen is also an active composer, pianist and exponent of the electric trombone and co-leads the project Big Bad Wolf.  Big Bad Wolf is a London based band featuring washy guitars, ambient vocals, brassy hooks and deep grooves. It features Rob Luft on guitar, Owen Dawson on trombone, Michael De Souza on bass VI and Jay Davis on drums and percussion. Owen was awarded the 2016 Durham Distillery Composition Prize and in 2014 was winner of the British Trombone Society Don Lusher Award. He has also been the resident pianist of the Blues Kitchen Choir since its launch in August 2014.

 

Owen dawson

 

Hi Owen, tea or coffee? 

Hi Ian, coffee please.

Milk and sugar? 

No thanks. 

 

 

 

 

If you could ask two past jazz musicians to join us for the tea break, who would you invite? 

Bob Brookmeyer and Jim Hall. I’ve been really into their duo playing for a while now, particularly a little bootleg of a gig in Bath that I was given by Mark Nightingale. On top of it being some of the most open and organic playing they also both sound like they’ve got a sense of humour so maybe they’d be a laugh during the tea break!  

Also I’m a big fan of Brookmeyer’s writing and arranging so I’d have plenty to ask him about that. One of my favorite charts of his is his arrangement of Skylark, particularly the intro. (click here for the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra playing Bob Brookmeyer's take on Skylark).

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Custard Cream or digestive biscuit? 

Have you run out of Garibaldis?? Hermato Pascoal

 

They do seem to run out quickly, I’ll see what’s in the cupboard. What gigs have you played recently?

I was extremely fortunate to be asked to be part of the big band for Hermeto Pascoal’s 80th birthday celebration at the Barbican in July which tops most other things I’ve done recently (or am likely to be doing soon)! 

Hermeto Pascoal

 

 

How are things going with Big Bad Wolf? 

Great! We’ve been pretty busy writing and playing over the last few months and we’ve just released a few live videos from a gig at the Green Note back in May. I’ll leave the most exciting news for the next question though … 

 

Here is Big Bad Wolf playing Canary In A Coalmine.

 

 

 

 

Big Bad Wolf

 

What have you got coming up in the next few months? 

… we’re going to record our first album! We won some generous funding from Help Musicians UK so we’re going to be heading to Giant Wafer Studios in Wales at the end of August. Keep your eyes peeled for updates!

Big Bad Wolf

 

 

 

I shall, let me know as soon as you have something to share or preview. Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for? 

Definitely the best gig that I’ve seen recently was the album launch of Matthew Bourne’s Moogmemory, which you must listen to … also in the same gig were Snack Family and a guitarist called Stef Ketteringham who are both incredible! 

 

Another biscuit?

Go on then, but only if it’s a Garibaldi!

 

Big Bad Wolf playing Flats In Dagenham]

 

 

Utah Teapot

 

 

Lara Eidi (Vocals) August 2016

 

Lara Eidi

 


Lara Eidi is one of those singers who connects with the audience as soon as she starts to sing. Perhaps psychologists can explain the gift – and it is a gift – personality? a love for what she is doing? an empathy with the music and the band? knowing she can take her great voice where she wants it to go? Whatever it is, it gained her a distinction and an appreciative audience at her final recital for her Master’s degree at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in June.

Lara Eidi is a singer-songwriter of Greek, Lebanese and Canadian ethnicity previously living in Greece and now based in London. She recorded her first album, an EP, Little People in 2012 followed by a further EP, Tell It Like It Is in 2014. She has played in Beirut, Lebanon (International Music Festival) and at the 2013 Edinburgh Fringe Festival.  Her Lara Collective band became established in Greece where they made a number of videos that are now available on Youtube. If you get the chance to hear her sing live, don't miss it.

We invited Lara to take a Tea Break:

 

Hi Lara, tea or coffee?

Hello! Coffee, without a doubt! A good coffee with a good friend is a must in life.

Milk and sugar?

Chocolate or cinnamon!!

 

Lara Eidi

 

If you could ask two past jazz musicians or vocalists to join us for the tea break, who would you invite?

Ohhh - a massive tea break with everything be would be ideal! But I would say Nina (Simone). I'd have coffee and a jam with Nina. I could listen to her stories all day and I'm convinced Oscar Peterson would be the most delightful coffee buddy.

 

What would you ask them?

I'd like to think I'd listen to them play. Anything I would ask would result into music. It was their truest form of expression. But I'd ask Nina how did she muster so much courage in her music and individuality to speak out on issues which prevented her and so many others to  perform in the first place?

 

 

 

 

 

Here's Lara singing Nina Simone's Be My Husband.
The video was recorded on a rooftop in downtown Athens with Stavros Parginos (cello) and Giotis Paraskeviades (guitar).

 

 

 

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Digestive biscuit. I'm always the one with cookies and a pint of cider at a jazz gig.

How did your degree course at Guildhall go?

Oh wow! Biggest roller coaster ride of my life. But the universe smiled and I graduated very happily and successfully. Moreover I learnt more about myself as an artist then I ever thought imaginable. Gratitude.

How was your final recital?

Amazing ! So fun! I felt totally free, and the musicians were freaking awesome!

 

Watch Lara's final recital at the Guildhall College of Music and Drama in June 2016 with
Edwin Ireland (bass); Charlotte Keeffe (trumpet); Jamie Saffiruden (piano) and Adam Teixeria (drums)

 

 

 

 

What have you got coming up in the future?

‘I've got rhythm ...’ - no just kidding! I've got some exciting projects coming up. I aim to really create a larger platform for crossover jazz, and am excited to finish some new compositions, ideally for an album. It's been two years since I've written, and now I've got so much inspiration it's inevitable!

iyatra Quartet

 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

I heard the iyatra Quartet recently - it's exactly the sort of thing that should be encouraged - classical and jazz musicians coming together for a major fusion of well, music! Also, I would recommend Jacob Collier but who hasn't heard of him?

[Click here for a video introducing the iyatra Quartet's 2015 album This World Alone].

 

Another biscuit?

Why yes , thank you !

 

Here is Lara singing Errol Garner's Misty at a private function in Athens

 

 

 

[Click here for Lara's Facebook page]

 

 

Utah Teapot

 

 

Corrie Dick (Drums) June 2016

 

Corrie Dick

 

Drummer Corrie Dick comes from Glasgow but is now based in London having graduated as a gold medal student from the jazz course at Trinity Laban Conservatoire. His awards include the BBC's 2013 Young Scottish Jazz Musician of the Year, the Scottish Jazz Awards "Up and Coming Artist" in 2012, and he has been nominated in the Parliamentary Jazz Awards several times including this year. He is an alumni of both the Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra and the National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland and has been mentored by the likes of Mark Guiliana, Kendrick Scott and Ari Hoenig as well as Ghanaian kpanlogo master Saddiq Addy, nephew of the legendary Mustapha Tettey Addy. He has also studied the traditional music of Zimbabwe, Madagascar, Benin and other parts of Africa alongside his prodigious creative companion, guitarist Rob Luft. Corrie plays in a number of bands both here and abroad and he released his debut album Impossible Things at the end of 2015.

 

Hi Corrie, tea or coffee?

Coffee, cheers Ian. Espresso if you do it? 


Garibaldi biscuit

 

No problem - Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

I have literally no idea what a Garibaldi is, will try that.

 

 

 


Buddy Rich, Max Roach or Paul Motian?

Max and Paul in equal measure.


Milk and sugar?

No, thanks.Corrie Dick

 


What gigs have you played recently?

A bunch of stuff. I've been working on a solo show and doing a few local gigs - hoping to move that a bit more next year. Also plenty with the band from my album. I've also been playing regularly with Laura Jurd's band Dinosaur and a bit with Pete Wareham, 'Little Lions' (a collaborative trio with Matt Robinson and Joe Webb) and lots with Rob Luft - look out for that guy, jeez...

 

 

 

[Here's a video of Corrie with Dinosaur playing Laura Jurd's composition Hardanger].

 

 

 


So what have you got coming up in the next few months?

Yeah I've got quite a lot, I have listed my gigs on my website (click here). Mainly I'm working towards a tour of the UK in August - September, I've got 17 dates booked and counting. And a few outside of the tour period too. I'm also thinking about my next move, I've got ideas that I'm really excited about - Little Lions is releasing it's first EP, Embers, on 17th June too.

 

[This video sees Little Lions playing Turn Our Back at Dempsey's in Cardiff in 2015]

 

 

 

 

Corrie Dick Impossible Things

 

 

What’s the reaction been to the new album Impossible Things?

GOOD. People seem to like it, which is great. Part of the reason I play music is to connect with people, I consider myself very lucky that the music I feel connected with is something that others can get in on.

[Click here to listen to Soar from the album].

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broen

Is there anyone you have heard recently that we should listen out for?

There are some phenomenal bands coming out of Norway like Broen, Mopti and Moskus. Also this great drummer from Holland called Mark Schilders is making some great music.

 

Broen

 

Huw Bennett Quintet

 

 

Also this bassist/producer Huw Marc Bennet has a great project called Susso - look out for that album!

Huw Bennett Quintet

 

 

 

 

 

Another biscuit?

Yeah, why not 😊

 

[Click here for our review of Corrie's album Impossible Things. Click here for Corrie's website]

[Click here for Corrie Dick's Band Of Joy playing Annamarrakech at Oliver's in 2015]

 

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Utah Teapot

 

 

 

Calum Gourlay (Bass) May 2016

 

Calum Gourlay is one of the UK's top bass players. Born in Glasgow, Calum first played cello in primary school and started playing double bass at fourteen. He was spotted by Tommy Smith and invited to join Scotland’s first Youth Jazz Orchestra and in 2004, he went Calum Gourlayto the Royal Academy of Music in London graduating with first class honours with a B.Mus. (Jazz) degree in 2008.  Since then he has become a leading bass player on the UK jazz scene performing with the Kit Downes Trio (Kit and James Maddren were his flat-mates at college), The Tommy Smith Group, Will Vinson, The Scottish National Jazz Orchestra and many other groups. His debut solo album Live At The Ridgeway was released in 2015.  Much sought after as he is, we invited him to take time out for a tea break:

 

Hi Calum, tea or coffee?

Coffee please Ian.


Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?


Garibaldi. Obviously.


Charles Mingus, Jaco Pastorius or Scott LaFaro?

Oh man. I've had big phases with all these guys. I guess Jaco at the moment as I'm trying to re-learn the electric bass. His instructional video is on YouTube and I think it's one of the best explanations of how to play an instrument I've ever seen. [Click here for a video of Jaco Pastorius talking about Arpeggios and Double Stops]. It seemed like everything Jaco touched Calum Gourlayturned to gold but it's worth remembering the amount of work he put in on the instrument in order to sound that good. But Mingus was one of the greatest musicians of the last 100 years. And Scotty changed the last half of the century for bass players ... I can't pick just one!

Milk and sugar?

I'm currently trying to avoid both of those things!



What gigs have you played recently?

Miles Ahead/Sketches of Spain with Gwilym Simcock, James Maddren and City of London Sinfonia horns last week.Gareth Williams trio at Wakefield Jazz. Thelonious at the Vortex every month playing Monk's tunes. I've also been recording some Hendrix-inspired music with Harpist and Composer Cevanne Horrocks-Hopayian and guitarist Chris Montague.

 

What have you got coming up in the next couple of months?

Scottish National Jazz Orchestra playing Brubeck in April. Tom Bancroft's Trio Red in May. .... and I'll be turning 30! [Calum plays regularly with the SNJO. Click here for a video of him playing with the Orchestra when they featured the amazing pianist Makoto Ozone.

 

 

 

Click here for our review of their recording with Makoto Ozone Jeunehomme].

 

 

Gabriel Latchin

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

Conor Chaplin an amazing bass player. Gabriel Latchin an amazing pianist.




Gabriel Latchin

Another biscuit?

I've had 4 Garibaldi's - I think that's too many!

 

[Click here to listen to Calum playing solo bass on Duke Ellington's Solitude. Click here for our review of Calum's 2015 debut solo album Live At The Ridgeway].

 

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Utah Teapot

 

 

 

Henry Spencer (Trumpet) April 2016

 

Trumpeter Henry Spencer is one of the young, gifted jazz musicians steadily making an impression in the UK at the present time. His band Juncture has a debut album due out this year and having heard the band play many of the tunes recorded, I anticipate great things. The band is also appearing at Ronnie Scott's Club this month, an endorsement in itself. Whether Henry is playing with Juncture or with another band, catch him if you can. (Click here for our Profile of Henry Spencer). We invited Henry to take a tea break:

 

Henry Spencer

 

Hi Henry, tea or coffee?

Tea please, although I'm surrounded by coffee snobs (in a nice way) so it's probably just a matter of time before I make the switch.Abbracci Biscuit

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

As a dipping purist I would say the digestive, and in the absence of a custard cream I'll go with the Bourbon. By the way, it's definitely worth checking out the 'Abbracci' biscuit. They're life changing, but also quite hard to find in London since they're Italian.

Freddie Hubbard, Chet Baker or Miles Davis?

Good question. I love all three. But overall, for his diverse, innovative and iconic approach as a player, composer and bandleader, it has to be Miles. He's always been a hero for me. Kind of Blue and Bitches Brew were, and still are massively influential to me.

Milk and sugar?

Just milk please. Although, milk with Earl Grey would be heartbreaking.

What gigs have you played recently?

I played at the 606 Club with the Ollie Howell band last week. I was recently at Ronnie Scott's with The Zealots and last night I was playing at the O2 Brooklyn Bowl with Crowd Company.

[Click here for Henry playing with the Ollie Howell band on their album Shadows due out in the autumn]
[Click here for funk band Crowd Company's video sampler]


Henry Spencer at Ronnie Scott's

What have you got coming up in the next few months?

I've recently been asked to perform at Ronnie Scott's with my group, Juncture, in the main show on April 7th. I'm really looking forward to this one.

In fact, my album with this group is very soon to be released. I actually recently got the radio edits back from New York from Dave Darlington (mixing/mastering engineer). I'm excited about realising them and showing what's been happening! There are also a few more shiny videos going up very soon of us playing live. (Search 'Henry Spencer Juncture' on YouTube.com).

 

Here is the 'teaser' video for the Juncture album The Reasons Don't Change

 

 

 

 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

Keep an eye and ear out for the Overground Collective. It's a big band that's made up of ridiculous musicians. All the players seem to have been taken from pretty heavy British jazz groups. I think the album is coming together at the moment.

[Click here for a video of the Overground Collective playing at the Vortex]

Another biscuit?

Always. I'll go out and get some custard creams. See you at Ronnie's on 7th April!

[Click here for Henry Spencer's website]

 

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Utah Teapot

 

 

Sam Braysher (Saxophone)- March 2016

 

Sam Braysher

 

Sam Braysher is a talented saxophonist who graduated in 2011 with a first class honours degree from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London before undertaking a two-year Guildhall Artist Fellowship at the school. London-based, he now has a busy freelance career playing a wide range of music, from the American songbook to traditional jazz and swing, contemporary repertoire and new music as well as leading his own Quartet. He teaches instrumental lessons at three schools in East London as well as privately, and has also taught jazz saxophone to undergraduate music students at City University London.

 

Hi Sam, tea or coffee?

Builder's tea please.

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Hob Nob.

 

Charlie Parker, Art Pepper or Ornette Coleman?

They're all great but Parker amazes me more than almost any other musician. He's probably my all time favourite.

[Click here to read Sam's article on Charlie Parker's Cherokee as part of our Full Focus series]

 

Milk and sugar?

Quite strong and milky - no sugar thanks. Gabriel Latchin, the pianist, makes a fantastic cup of tea - he warms the cup before putting the teabag in and everything.

 

Sam Braysher QuartetWhat gigs have you played recently?

I have been playing with Will Arnold-Forster's Quartet at Ronnie Scott's, Barry Green's new sextet at the Vortex, the John Warren Nonet at Jazz Nursery (we played a new suite that he was commissioned to write), Alex Mendham & His Orchestra in Belgium, the London City Big Band, a few trio things with Calum Gourlay and Josh Morrison, plus some quartet ones with the addition of Barry Green on piano.

 

 

 

Here's a video of the Sam Braysher Quartet playing at the Jazz Nursery - Sam Braysher (alto saxophone), Barry Green (piano), Calum Gourlay (double bass) and Josh Morrison (drums)

 

 

 

 

What have you got coming up in the next few months?

I'm doing a recording with the American pianist Michael Kanan, so that's my main focus at the moment - lots of practice and getting Michael Kananorganised forthat. Michael is an amazing pianist and I'm such a fan of his playing. He's probably best known as a member of the singer Jame Monheit's band, but he's also played with people like Jimmy Scott, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Jorge Rossy, Annie Ross, Ted Brown, Mark Turner and lots of others. We'll mostly be playing lesser known tunes from the American Songbook and jazz canon, as well as a few other things, and I'm hoping to organise a tour to coincide with the release at some point in the not too distant future.

Michael Kanan

I shall also be playing with the London City Big Band at the Spice Of Life in Soho on the last Wednesday evening of each month when I can.

[Click here for a video of Michael Kanan and guitarist Peter Bernstein playing Embraceable You ]

 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

I've been listening to quite a few duo albums as part of my preparation for the aforementioned recording. Joe Lovano/Hank Jones, Ella Fitzgerald/Ellis Larkins, Jim Hall/Ron Carter, Jim Hall/Bill Evans, Al Cohn/Jimmy Rowles, Martin Speake/Ethan Iverson and Joel Frahm/Brad Mehldau are some of the ones I've enjoyed the most.

 

Another biscuit?

Go on then!

[Click here to visit Sam Braysher's website.]

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Carl Orr (Guitar) February 2016

 

[Click here for a video of Carl playing Mirage with the Billy Cobham band].


Carl Orr

Hi Carl, tea or coffee?

Coffee please. Espresso. 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Bourbon please 

Charlie Christian, John McLaughlin or Pat Metheny?

I’m influenced by all three of them. Charlie blasted on the scene with a new instrument, the electric guitar; his playing was completely original and highly charismatic. John defined jazz-rock guitar. Pat rebelled against what John was doing and steered things in a completely different direction which has turned out to be extremely influential as he very quickly grew into a musical visionary who simply could not be ignored and he has created a body of work of a degree of breadth and ambition that no other guitarist comes close to.However, John is my guy. He was the first guitarist to figure out how to play the guitar as a powerful virtuoso instrument of improvisation to rival the saxophone. He has also written a lot of highly original music. I transcribed many of his solos and spent countless hours practising them so I know his improvisational approach intimately. 

 

Milk and sugar?

One sugar please. No milk.

Tell me about Fletch’s Brew.

Fletch’s Brew grew organically at Ronnie Scott’s Club. Mark Fletcher started to get lots of gigs doing the ‘Late Late Shows’ on the weekends; he was booking a lot of different musicians and then, as I turned out to be available most of the time, I wound up doing most of the gigs, and eventually all of them. The same thing happened with the other musicians, trumpeter Freddie Gavita and bassist Steve Pearce. We had a couple of good years from about the beginning of 2013. We played mostly original tunes and developed a unique, highly interactive style, and had a huge dynamic range from super quiet all the way up to 11. It was a lot of fun for a while, we did dozens of great gigs. I am very thankful to Fletch for the opportunity to play so much great music.[Click here for a video of Fletch’s Brew playing Invitation in 2013].

What gigs have you been doing since Fletch’s Brew?

I’ve been playing with my band, which is very different to Fletch’s Brew, funkier and more accessible, and sounds at times like a modernised Headhunters with a lunatic playing the guitar out front. The band is Bill Mudge on keyboards, Giovanni Pallotti on bass and Davide de Rose on drums. You may be familiar with Bill, but you probably don’t know the names of the two Italians as Giovanni is very young and Davide mainly plays with African artists and isn’t known in the jazz scene, despite being one hell of a jazz drummer He is the son of highly respected Italian jazz pianist Nino de Rose.I am also spending a lot of time promoting my latest album, Forbearance. It’s a very lavish project based around my acoustic guitar, produced by Tim van der Kuil, who plays guitar with Adele, and boasting strings and horns arranged by Grant Windsor, and my dear friend Billy Cobham is guesting on one track.

What are you planning for the coming year?

To do an Australian tour and to expand my audience, both geographically and airplay-wise.

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

As far as live music goes, I heard Chick Corea play recently and Charles Altura, his guitarist is a monster with a very likeable, persuasive style, as is his drummer Marcus Gilmore, Roy Haynes's grandson. I also like the Israeli guitarist Yotam Silberstein and the amazing young Scottish guitarist Ant Law. I also heard Nils Petter Molvaer a couple of months ago and I was mesmerised for his whole set.As far as recorded music, I discovered an underrated masterpiece recently, Jeremy Lubbock’s Awakening and I listen to it, in whole or in part, almost every day.[Click here to listen to Jeremy Lubbock’s Awakening].

How do you think the world of jazz is looking at the moment?

I am thinking that jazz has no chance of increasing in popularity as long as musicians fixate on impressing other musicians as their main focus, driving the music inexorably into deeper and deeper obscurity and demoting it increasingly to the preserve of fellow musicians and a tiny minority of non-musician aficionados. Billy Cobham taught me about realising that the audience have paid good money to hear us play and we have to really communicate with them, and the best way to do that is to cast aside the ego and just be natural and present yourself with a degree of light-heartedness.

There’s a dearth of humour in jazz. I have witnessed many gigs in which nobody in the band so much as cracked a smile. There’s no need for showbiz “stage-smiling” or joking around, but, if the performers have a sense of gratitude for the privilege of playing music for a listening audience, happiness should naturally manifest itself. The great jazz musicians of the past such as Armstrong, Ellington and Carl OrrGoodman played music of the highest quality that was palatable to the average person. I do not play music that even vaguely resembles the music of any of those gigantic musical geniuses, but I am inspired by their example and seek to emulate it in a totally modern way. 

I also believe that it’s important for musicians to seek out older musicians, bandleaders and composers, that is, to train with them onstage. Just practising and writing and studying is not enough. When I was young I sought out such training and as a result I worked with a great bassist/composer Jackie Orszaczky in Sydney for a few years, and he really trained me in playing effectively as part of a rhythm section. Then I trained with the great Australian saxophonist Dale Barlow (he played with Cedar Walton and Art Blakey), and he trained me in improvisation, keeping it interesting and using a different approach in every tune. [Click here for a video of Carl playing Visby with Dale Barlow in 1995 at Wangaratta Jazz Festival Australia].Then finally I trained with Billy Cobham, who gave me invaluable guidelines on how to play my instrument better, and trained me to really project and command the audience through finding a way to just be natural onstage, and to truly embrace and enjoy all good music, regardless of genre. And remember, music is your contribution to world peace. If you keep that in the centre of your focus, you are able to rise above all the “noise” in your head (“Am I playing good enough?” etc).

[Click here to listen to Carl’s cover of Donald Fagen’s Tomorrow’s Girls].

Another biscuit?

Yes, I’ll always have another biscuit! Can’t you tell from my photos?[Carl Orr’s latest album Forbearance is reviewed below. As Carl says: ‘It’s not a jazz album, so it will grievously disappoint from that perspective, but, it’s a finely-crafted showcase of my playing and composing with the intention of appealing to a large audience without an ounce of compromise’. Llisten to How Can I Say? from the album].

 

 

 

[Click here for Carl Orr’s website. Carl also has his latest news on Facebook - click here].

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Alastair Penman (Saxophone) February 2016

 

Alastair Penman is a British saxophonist with Masters’ degrees in both Information and Computer Engineering (University of Cambridge) and Saxophone Performance (Royal Northern College of Music). He plays in both classical and jazz settings, including with the Philharmonia Chamber Orchestra, Ardente Opera, The Beethoven Ensemble, Ensemble BPM and Cambridge Touring Opera. He Alastair Penmanhas received awards from the City Music Foundation, Countess of Munster Musical Trust, the RNCM (Fewkes and Harwood Scholarships) and St Catharine’s College (Music Tuition and Dudley Robinson Awards).  He was also a finalist in the Yamaha Music Foundation of Europe Competition 2012 and the RNCM Gold Medal Competition 2013.

In a jazz setting, Alastair has played at Montreux, London and Tarrega Jazz festivals and at venues including Budapest Jazz Club, Casa del Jazz (Rome) and The Bull’s Head (Barnes). Alastair has performed with jazz greats Mike Gibbs, Steve Waterman, Clare Teal, Mark Nightingale, Gareth Lockrane, Julian Arguelles, Liane Carroll, Issie Barratt and John Helliwell. He has a strong interest in the fusion of live saxophone performance with electronic effects, backings, and enhancements to create often previously undiscovered sound-worlds.

Hi Alastair, tea or coffee?

Tea please!  One after lunch, one mid afternoon and one after dinner, unless it's a long day...


Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Can I have one of each?  OK, I’ll take the Bourbon then!


Wayne Shorter, Charlie Parker or Jimmy Giuffre?

For me, it’s Art Pepper - I became somewhat obsessed with his playing when I was about 17 and he’s probably still my strongest influence from the jazz world.  That said, I love all of the above - if pushed I’d probably take Parker from the three, but it’s a close call.  Shorter is the only one I’ve had the chance to hear live – I wish I’d been able to hear them all!


Milk and sugar?

Just milk - do you have soy?!


What have you been doing recently?

For the past few months, my main focus has been my new album, Electric Dawn.  I had a great time working with John Harle on the disc and recording it at his studios in Kent.  He’s a phenomenal musician and producer with a brilliant ear - he had a big influence on the disc.  After finishing the recording, I had to make sure that the whole disc was reproducible live - programming all of the electronics and ironing out bugs (there were a couple of scary moments early on when my laptop crashed mid-piece whilst practising!) - before launching the album with a few gigs.  I was lucky enough to play at the Royal Northern College of Music’s Saxophone Day a few months back, which was a huge honour as I’ve been attending the event for years and past performers have included the likes of Ian Ballamy, Chris Potter, Bob Mintzer and Julian Arguelles!

[Here is a video introduction to Alastair's new album Electric Dawn].

 

 




What have you got coming up in February and March?

I’ve got a bit more of a focus on the classical side of my playing over the next few months.  I’m doing a recital of some beautiful French saxophone repertoire with pianist Edward Liddall at St. Martin-in-the-Fields on February 9th, and then I’ve got a couple of gigs with the Borealis Saxophone Quartet, with whom I play soprano sax (click here for a video).  It’s an exciting time for the quartet as we’ve just had Alastair Penmana change in personnel so we’re all getting used to the new line-up.  On 5th March, we’ve been invited up to the RNCM to give a late night concert in their chamber music festival, which should be good fun - it’s always a pleasure to play at the RNCM since it’s where I studied and where the quartet formed.  I’ve got a few other projects in their infant stages as well - watch this space!


Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

I love the new album from Carl Raven and George King, which was out before Christmas (Scenes From A Life) - really beautiful playing, and Carl’s use of electronics with the sax is so seamless.  I’ve also been enjoying hearing where both Tom Green and Misha Mullov-Abbado are going with their groups - I was lucky enough to play a lot with both of them and some of the guys in their bands when we were all at Cambridge together.  Maybe we’ll play together again one day - who knows?!  I’ve also heard that Andy Scott’s SaxAssault have been back in the studio recently, which can only mean there’s some hard hitting sax playing coming our way soon!

Another biscuit?

Always! Oh dear, are we onto the next packet already?!

[Click here for Alastair Penman's website].

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Ian Maund (Sandy Brown Jazz)- January 2015

 

This month I spend my tea break talking to myself ....

Ian Maund

Hi Ian, tea or coffee?

An Americano with cold milk please. As it's my second, it had better be a decaff.

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

I do like Bourbons. Mind you, I am a sucker for warm panettone (Nero, Costa) or fruit toast (Starbucks), depending where I am working.

Bix Beiderbecke, Miles Davis, Cecil Taylor or Kit Downes?

It depends what mood I'm in. I return regularly to Bix and Miles; I could listen to Kit play live for hours. I only dip into free jazz occasionally so Cecil Taylor is not a frequent taste. I usually leave more avant garde reviews to people like Steve Day who has a stronger affinity for the music, although it is good to listen to some of this music with people like Kit DownesSteve who is able to help me appreciate what is going on. I also like to include articles that 'unwrap' the music and explain some of the background (e.g. Tom Green talking about his Equilibrium album (click here), Alec Harper talking about his Beaker recording (click here) or Alex Killpartrick (click here) on recording).

Kit Downes

I really miss listening to music with trombonist Tony Milliner who died last year, we would spend hours with his collection of vinyl and his experience and enthusiasm was immeasurable. I try to avoid listening only to jazz as I enjoy other music and I think it helps put everything in perspective, so you will find me listening to Puccini, Prokofiev, Ravel, Sondheim, Steely Dan, the Proclaimers ...

Milk and sugar?

Just milk, thank you. Except one sugar in my first cup of tea in the morning.

What have you been doing on the website recently?

November and December have been a bit squeezed. We went on holiday to Cornwall in November, rather late, but my wife (Maria Wojdat) who does ceramics had various shows on earlier in the year. In December we spent time with family over the Christmas holiday. I tend to work on the website most mornings in local coffee shops where I find it better to concentrate. As many readers know, it Frank Griffithis just me, I don't have 'staff', so I am eternally grateful to those who help review albums, send in articles, or like Brian O'Connor, let me have recent pictures from gigs.

Frank Griffith

I particularly enjoy writing and researching - that takes time and putting text, pictures and links into the site is time consuming too. I really appreciate including things other people have written as that adds colour and variety the site, so articles like Sam Braysher's piece about Charlie Parker (click here), Frank Griffith's interview with Sir John Dankworth (click here), or Roger Trobridge talking about Harmonica Jazz (click here) are very welcome.

I am sent a lot of emails and albums to review so it is a question of trying to select which to include. The last few days of the month is always hectic trying to get the site finished and checked.

What have you got coming up in January?

I shall start on the next issue as soon as the January 1st issue is online. I have been meaning to include an article about cartoonist Jimmy Thomson for some time so that is in the pipeline and I am hoping to read Keiron Pim's new book on David Litvinoff. I am planning to go up to London from Wells during the month to catch a gig or two - the London City Big Band at the Spice Of Life is always a joy to hear, and I am looking forward to interviewing some musicians who don't get much exposure. My grandson who is doing computer studies at college is encouraging me to change the layout of the site, but I have had readers say how they like the uncomplicated format without advertisements running all the time, so I'll need to think carefully about that. There are other jazz sites online, some of them sponsored by advertising, so I try to keep to Sandy Brown Jazz's straightforward 'magazine' format with something for everyone. I should be interested in readers' opinions about this.

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

There are so many! That's great - it shows the music is thriving. Trumpeter and bandleader Henry Spencer should have a new album out this year that I am looking forward to. Cath Roberts has been acknowledged by Jazzwise as 'someone to listen out for' and she and Dee Byrne have been doing excellent stuff through LUME for some years now. I heard The Dixie Ticklers at the Albert Hall at the end ofMiguel Gorodi last year - what a great band (see article above) and good to see the room packed for the gig. Miguel Gorodi on trumpet and flugelhorn goes from strength to strength. I heard him with Ian Shaw a few months ago - Ian's 2012 recording of Fran Landesman's songs A Ghost In Every Bar remains one of my favourite albums.

Miguel Gorodi.

All the time new, talented musicians are emerging and it raises an issue for me (and others) in that we try to bring them to readers' / listeners' attention, but that tends to be fleeting, there is always someone else 'new' coming along. How do we, or musicians themselves, keep up their profile? Some have an ability to publicise themselves well and consistently, others do not. Colleges do not seem to give sufficient time to students to help them understand the 'business' side of the industry. I am not sure that social media covers every angle in maintaing a musician's profile despite its popularity. I welcome the chance to interview young musicians and profile them on the site, they just have to get in touch, and if they have a decent video showreel and some tracks people can listen to online, so much the better.

Another biscuit?

I think that would be a good idea, thank you. Tea break over, better get on, tomorrow is New Year's Eve and the site goes live the day after. Thank you to everyone who has been in touch with me, given time for interviews, sent review albums, reviews, items for the website, etc. through the year. My best wishes for the New Year - I hope 2016 turns out to to be a good one.

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Dave Manington (Bass)- December 2015

 

Dave Manington

Hi Dave, tea or coffee?

A nice cuppa tea please.

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Garibaldi? Not had one of those for a while.

 

Ray Brown, Jaco Pastorius or Charlie Haden?

If I had to choose it would definitely be Charlie Haden. I love them all but Charlie Haden is my biggest influence in terms of double bass playing. Never a flashy player but lovely big full sound, great time and brilliant choice of notes. Every note counts… Favourite albums are “Shades” “Survivors Suite” and any one of the Keith Jarrett American Quartet/Trio records. I love his duo albums especially the Hank Jones one “Steal Away” and the John Taylor one “Nightfall”. I also love the Geri Allen/Paul Motian/Charlie Haden ones like “In the Year of the Dragon”. He’s good on everything. (Click here to listen to Charlie Haden and Hank Jones playing Spiritual from the Steal Away album).

 

Milk and sugar?

Just milk, ta.

 

What gigs have you played recently?

November was a busy month. I’ve been playing in Poland, Norway and Lithuania with Marius Neset’s band which has been a treat, it’s a real high energy band. I’ve had gigs with Tori Freestone’s trio ahead of a recording for our 2nd album as a band later in the month. The London Jazz Festival kept me busy, including gigs with Yazz Ahmed, The Button Band and Lukas Oravec, a great trumpeter from Slovakia. In terms of my own projects, I’ve had a couple of gigs with a new trio version of my band, just myself, Brigitte Beraha on vocals Dave Maningtonand Rob Updegraff on guitar. We’re trying out some folksier songs and all three of us are using loop pedals at various points to add to the texture. Finally to top it all off, I got to play with one of my musical heroes when I played with Iain Ballamy at e17jazz on the 24th!

 

What have you got coming up in December and January?

Another gig with Tori Freestone at Leicester Jazz House on 11th December, a tribute to recently departed Allen Toussaint with New Orleans band The Coalminers at Ronnie Scott’s on the 20th December, and the E17 Large Ensemble at e17jazz on the 22nd December. In January I have nothing so far so I’ll sleep, run and practice!

 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

The best thing I’ve heard recently is Julian Argüelles’s Tetra. Sounds like Jarrett’s European Quartet at their best.
(See Howard Lawes's review of Julian Argüelles’s Tetra album).

 

Another biscuit?

Why not?!

Click here for the article by Dave Manington talking about the track Agile from his album Hullabaloo. Click here for Dave's website.

 

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Simon Spillett(Saxophone)- November 2015

 

Described by the late Humphrey Lyttelton as "formidable," Simon Spillett is a British jazz saxophonist who leads his own quartet featuring John Critchinson (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Clark Tracey (drums). He has won several awards for his music, including the tenor saxophone category of the British Jazz Awards (2011), Jazz Journal magazine's Critic's Choice CD of the Year (2009) and Rising Star in the BBC Jazz Awards (2007).

Simon Spillett


Hi Simon, tea or coffee?

These days it's Herbal Tea. 

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

I've always been partial to a Garibaldi...

 

Simon Spillett
Photograph by Jerry Storer

 

Tubby Hayes, Joe Henderson or Pharoah Sanders?

... And I thought choosing the biscuits was hard .... I've listened a lot to all three; Joe Henderson is among my favourites (Inner Urge is one of greatest sax-led quartet albums ever) and I've been a Pharoah fan since hearing Upper and Lower Eygpt when I was about 18. I had just joined a rock band and the guitarist played me a tape of "this sax player....he's mental!" It was Pharoah. As for Tubby, he was and always will be the guv'nor for me.

 

Milk and sugar?

Neither. I'm on a health kick.

 

What gigs have you played recently?

I had a busy September. Clark Tracey and I debuted our Big Band Britannia show, featuring Tubby and Stan Tracey's music, at the Herts Jazz Festival; the Quartet with John Critchinson, Alec Dankworth, Clark and myself played a small festival in Maidenhead and I did a couple of Quintet gigs with Art Themen and Peter King. On top of that, there were a string of solo dates.

 

What have you got coming up in November and December?

My quartet are playing Ronnie's on November 1st, playing Tubby's music. Then on November 19th we're appearing at the launch of the Mark Halenew documentary film Tubby Hayes: A Man in a Hurry at Ray's Jazz in Foyles, Charing Cross Road.

We also have gigs including The Verdict (Brighton), Fleece Jazz (Essex), Welwyn Garden City (Herts Jazz), Twickenham Jazz Club and The Eagle, Rochester.

 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

Two great young drummers, Billy Weir and Mark Hale. Also, trumpeter Jack Kendon, He's a great player and runs what is to my mind one of the best jazz gigs anywhere, the Bristol Bar in Brighton.

Mark Hale

 

Another biscuit?

Simon: Just this once....

[Simon is also the author of The Long Shadow Of The Little Giant (2015): The Life, Work and Legacy of Tubby Hayes. Click here for details of and to sample the album Introducing Simon Spillett. Click here for Simon's website].

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Andrew Linham (Saxophone)- November 2015

 

Andrew Linham

Hi Andrew, tea or coffee?

Well as a general rule I don’t drink tea or coffee unless I’m in a foreign country, so I usually opt for strawberry milkshake before twelve. After twelve perhaps ribena or coca cola and after 6 wine normally is the winner. Unless I’m the designated driver, in which case more coca cola. 

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

I do love a bourbon! Though I often hit the chocolate festival hard at elevenses time with a mid morning twirl (both the chocolate bar and a spin). If you find Jaffa Cakes or Percy Pigs, you know that your day is going to be great!

 

Harry Carney, Gerry Mulligan or Ronnie Ross?

In typical Linham fashion I can’t give a straight answer so will, in my humble opinion, go one better, with Pepper Adams. Or Ronnie Cuber. Now I just feel like I’m having to pick between loved ones to save from a sinking ship. I love them all!  [Click here for Ronnie Cuber playing baritone sax on Charles Mingus's Moanin' recording].

 

Milk and sugar?

Milk and sugar in a strawberry milkshake is essential. As is ice cream. Oh, and those hundreds of thousands.  



What gigs have you played recently?

Andrew: Well I recently premiered a new ensemble of mine, The Andrew Linham Swing Thing at the Queens Theatre, Hornchurch. I forget how wonderful it is when jazz is put on a proper stage rather than some dimly lit back alley. The concert hall setting really makes Andrew Linham Orchestra posterfor a different kind of performance with a different audience interaction. I’ve also enjoyed being back with MIMIKA and London City Big Band in their residencies at the Spice of Life, as those two bands are fantastic at two very different things!

 

What have you got coming up in November / December?

On Sunday 15th November my big band the Andrew Linham Jazz Orchestra will be hitting the Spice of Life hard in the evening to present some brand new music 'The Theme of Anarchic Animals’ featuring a mad cohort of musicians. I will also tell a story about a imaginary woman called Big Bertha. It is going to be such good fun. Also in the afternoon of the same day, MIMIKA Mak Murtic Ensemble are performing so you can come for a whole day of jazz with me in it. Or me innit, for those who speak slang. And yes, I will tell more terrible jokes. 

 

 

Jamie Leeming

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

There’s a couple of people I’ve been watching recently - Phaze Theory are sounding fantastic, Jamie Leeming’s band were sound great the other day, VLookup Trio has making some amazing sonic soundscapes and they are really underrated. As for CD listening, I’ve been enjoying the new Loose Tubes album and Phil Meadow’s Lifecycles CD is currently in the car. Well, alongside the best of Disney and Kenneth Williams as Rambling Syd Rumpo. Hysterically funny bawdy comedy combined with uber cheesy musicals and mad modern jazz. Probably a fair summary of my listening tastes.

Jamie Leeming

 

 

Another biscuit?

Oooh, It’d be rude not to. But if you eat too many your Doctor will tell you to bis-quit. 

Click here for our Profile of Andrew Linham. Click here for Andrew's website.

 

[Click here to listen to the Andrew Linham Jazz Orchestra playing I Arsque You This]

 

 

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Bryan Corbett(Trumpet)- October 2015

 

Bryan Corbett

 

Hi Bryan, tea or coffee?

Bryan: Coffee

 

Hob Nob, Bourbon, Garibaldi or digestive biscuit?

Bryan:  Hob Nob

 

 

Chet Baker, Clifford Brown or Roy Eldridge?

As a player Clifford Brown had everything but Chet always does it. 'She Was Too Good For Me' is still my favorite album. Roy Eldridge is a master and someone I need to listen to more.

 

Milk and sugar?

Just milk, sugar is a killer. 

 

What gigs have you played recently?

Pershore Jazz Festival (Quartet); Foley Arms Hotel, Malvern (Trio); Tony Christie (Residency Blackpool North Pier); Numerous Muscle Shoals Hornsrecording sessions; RLEBB (Res Lemons Electric Blues Band) (30 years reunion) Storbridge Town Hall.

 

What have you got coming up in  October?

Various Tony Christie theatre dates; Some corporate gigs and a Trio gig at Corks Club in Birmingham (1st October), and my new Quartet album is out.

 

Who else have you heard recently that we should listen out for?

 Kneedbody, Muscle Shoals Horns, Alex Sipiagin

[Click here for Alex Sipiagin playing Next Stop - Tuskiji with Alex Sipiagin (trumpet); Chris Potter (tenor saxophone); David Binney (alto saxophone); Craig Taborn (piano, fender rhodes); Boris Kozlov (bass); Eric Harland (drums) from the album Destinations Unknown. Click picture to listen to Muscle Shoals Horns]

 

Another biscuit?

No thanks but I will take a coffee, oh go on then!

Click here for a video of Bryan and the Quartet playing Try A Little Tenderness .

 

Bryan Corbett's new Quartet album is available through Bryan's website at www.bryancorbett.co.uk. Bryan says: 'It is a live recording from 'Fleece Jazz' earlier this year. I think it captures the quartet - myself, Al Gurr, Neil Bullock and Ben Markland very well and has some really magical moments. Its best part of 10 years since the Quartet put out a recording and people always ask for what they just heard. So here it is. It's a double CD as there is too much for a single and I did not want to split up the recording.'

Click here for our Profile of Bryan Corbett.

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